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archival descriptions
Sous-fonds
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Community Oral Histories collection

The Community Oral Histories collection is an artificially created collection of oral histories of The Pas and area community members, which were not conducted by or associated with the Sam Waller Museum. The collection consists of nineteen audio tapes of interviews with members of the community and summary transcripts of the interviews, as well as other audio records. Oral history interviews include Jack Walker, May Bridle, Hector Pocock, Phil Reader, Alec Russell, Ford McMillan, Syd Allen, Burt Hutton, Blake McKay, Bella Cochrane, Florence Gudgeon, Geoff Smith, Phyllis Chartrand, Tom Lamb, and Ed Johanson. Other audio recordings include The 3 Dee’s and the Trappers’ Festival 1965.

Gertrude Johnson fonds

The fonds consists of three minute and record books acting as guest books/diaries, with most entries written by Gertrude Johnson. Guest book entries refer to people visiting a cabin or camp at Clearwater Lake, as well as weather observations at the lake. The guest books cover the years from 1928-1967. No biographical information on Gertrude Johnson is known.

University of Manitoba Cyclotron Laboratory sous-fonds

  • CA UMASC UA 53 (A12-71)
  • Sous-fonds
  • 1957-1989

The Cyclotron Laboratory sous-fonds documents the research and construction of the cyclotron as well as additional changes over the project’s lifetime. The sous-fonds contains four series: Cyclotron Technical Drawings, Research Materials, a cyclotron drawing index and Photographs.

The cyclotron was conceptualized in 1957 when the head of the Physics Department, B.G. Whitmore, proposed the construction of a cyclotron at the University of Manitoba based on the prototype at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). With a $70,000 initial grant release, the construction began underneath the parking lot adjacent to the Allen Physics building on the Fort Garry Campus in 1959. Although the original proposal of the design was based on the UCLA cyclotron, almost all the design detail was completed by the staff at the University of Manitoba. The cyclotron vault, the shielding and the two experimental areas together occupied 5,000 square feet, while the control room and the electrical room took up another 2,000 square feet of floor area. The cyclotron was officially opened in 1965. It was the second cyclotron in Canada and the first in Western Canada.

The U of M cyclotron was considered a pioneer model of cyclotron design during that period, it being a spiral-ridge or sector-focused cyclotron. The sector-focused cyclotron is one of the most useful tools of nuclear physicists. Being the only negative hydrogen ion cyclotron operating between 20 MeV and 50 MeV in North America, it could generate beams of high quality and intensity in order to tackle some of the physics problems in atomic and subatomic physics that require such facilities. Axial injection was introduced to separate the ion source from the cyclotron itself, the source being housed in a building at ground level while the cyclotron was situated two floors below. This made it possible to improve the performance of the ion source and to develop a source of polarized ions without having to deal with the high radiation environment at the centre of the cyclotron.

Over the next two decades after the cyclotron opened, it attracted various physicists, engineers and students to the university to help assist with the project and made it a major turning point within the department.

In 1986, under the directorship of Dr. Jasper McKee, the cyclotron’s uses expanded to other areas of research other than nuclear physics. The Cyclotron Laboratory changed its name to Accelerator Centre to serve as the University Research Centre where interdisciplinary and applied research could be carried out in conjunction with external laboratories and/or the private sector. The Accelerator Centre ceased operation in 1989.

Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba

Peter Tittenberger sous-fonds

  • CA UMASC Mss 24, Pc 18 (A.81-12, A.81-23, A.81-40, A.84-49, A.85-06, A.85-07, A.91-33, A.95-20, A.01-47)-PC 18 (A.95-20)
  • Sous-fonds
  • 1961 - 1980
  • Part of Winnipeg Tribune fonds

The sous-fonds contains negatives taken by Winnipeg Tribune photographers depicting events and personalities in and around Winnipeg and throughout Manitoba.

Birnie

school records for years listed
Birnie 465 1886 - 1954 - 1968
The first school was built in 1886, three quarters of a mile from the Grover home and just across the road from the A. Henton lane, on SE 3-17-15. It was named North End No 465. The school was moved and a new brick school was built east of town in 1909 and called Birnie School.

Orange Ridge

attendance registers
Orange Ridge 576 1889 – 1968
Brydges S.D. #576 was formed in 1889. Two buildings on three different sites served this small school district which was carved out of the much larger postal community of Orange Ridge. In 1929 Brydges School District was changed to Orange Ridge so it could be identified with the community from which it developed. The first teacher was Miss Minnie Glennie.
Final site of the school was on SE 18-17-14

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