Showing 31243 results

archival descriptions
Print preview View:

5246 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

Interview with Abe Arnold, Session 5

Session 5 of 8, of the Abe Arnold interview.

Session Summary:
Abe begins the session speaking about his health issues and the medical treatment of them while he was living in Vancouver. He then turns to speaking about his work at the Jewish Western Bulletin during the 1950s. Abe tells how he moved to Montreal in 1960 and began work as the Publicity and Public Relations Director for the Jewish Federation (later Allied Jewish Community Services), which was primarily doing editing work. Both he and his wife Bertha found better paying work in Montreal. Abe also speaks about the special education one of his daughters required in Montreal, and working with his wife Bertha and other community members toward establishing such a class for children in their community. Abe talks briefly about challenges his children faced during this time, one of his daughters enduring an illness, and there being not sport facility for his son to continue his track and field, and later some difficulty with school. Abe recalls being hospitalized in 1961, to have a lung operation, and his wife Bertha then becoming ill with Tuberculosis in 1963. Abe continues to speak about his work writing and his involvement in politics in Montreal and becoming established in his work, as the Executive Director of the Canadian Jewish Congress in Winnipeg, after moving there in [1966?]. He speaks briefly to the experiences of his children at this time, and concludes the section describing his participation in forming the Manitoba Human Rights Association in 1968.

Reilly, Nolan

Interview with Abe Arnold, Session 4

This is Session 4 of 8, of the Abe Arnold interview, including session log and transcript.

Session Summary:
Abe begins the session by remembering a family vacation the Arnolds took in 1953. He then discusses his work in the mid-1950s, writing columns which addressed anti-Semitism. He recalls the stigma of communism during these years and how that indirectly caused trouble for him in his work. Abe details his work as the Research Chair for the Vancouver Centennial Committee (Folk Festival), and also some of the travel he did for his writing, his starting the “first Jewish Archives collection” in Vancouver and recalls the first International Festival in Vancouver in 1958. Abe recalls his first trip to Israel in 1959. Abe discusses the Canadian Jewish Congress’ celebration of the bi-centennial of Jewish settlement in Canada, and being appointed Chairman of the Bi-Centennial Committee. Abe discusses the B.C. Provincial Government’s troubles with the Doukhobors. He recalls doing a program on the C.B.C. and writing articles on human rights issues, and discusses his professional relationship with Saul Hayes (National Executive Director-Canadian Jewish Congress). Abe recalls some of the artists he worked with while in Vancouver. Abe concludes the session by telling about a Quebec news writer who noted one of Abe’s articles on Jews in Canada as one of his preferred renditions of that history.

Reilly, Nolan

Interview with Abe Arnold, Session 3

This is Session 3 of 8 of the Abe Arnold interview, including session log and transcript.

Session summary:
Abe begins the session by sharing the story of Abram in the Idolshop, a play he participated in as part of the Young Men’s Hebrew Association. He discusses growing into political consciousness. Abe recalls his time living in Toronto then the move to Vancouver in 1948. Abe recalls the work he did while in Vancouver, including detailed recollections of running the Jewish Western Bulletin, where his wife Bertha also worked. He recalls his activities and affiliations with several organizations, including the Canadian Jewish Congress, B’nai Brith, and the Civic Unity Association (a human rights group), the U.J.P.O. and the Peretz School. He recalls the political climate in B.C. in the early 1950s, including elements of anti-Semitism that were apparent at the time, and the politics between Canadian Jewish organizations during this time. He recalls the purchase of their first car and house, and the birth of twin daughters all in 1951. Throughout the interview session Abe recalls key players in organizations and politics, illustrating the relationships and interpersonal dynamics between them.

Reilly, Nolan

Interview with Abe Arnold, Session 2

This is Session 2 of 8 of the Abe Arnold interview.

Session Summary:
This session includes Arnold speaking about his maternal grandparents and children; father’s siblings, Jewish holidays with his family; his work from the early 1940s (Joseph Gould and Sons in Toronto); education in drafting and mechanical drawing; service in the army; the onset of his illness; involvement in the Young Communist League; first article in Volchenblatt and Modern Digest; marriage to wife Bertha in 1945; freelance work for Montreal Standard, Canadian Film Weekly; work at Anglo-Jewish News Service (1946-47); attendance at meeting of the Jewish Press Association (1946); influential leftist literature; Gouzenko Affair; political climate in Ontario through the 1940s; his family in the 1940s.

Reilly, Nolan

Interview with Abe Arnold, Session 1

This is the first of 8 Abe Arnold interview sessions.

This interview session includes Arnold's early life in Montreal, his parents, and his family's circumstances living in Montreal's Jewish neighbourhoods.

Reilly, Nolan

Abe Arnold Interview

1 oral history interview with Abraham Arnold, conducted over 8 sessions (8h 41mm 22ss total). The Interview, conducted by Nolan Reilly, is a life story interview that explores Arnold's life and career as a culturally and politically committed member of Canada’s immigrant Jewish community. The interview was conducted in Winnipeg primarily between 2006 and 2007, with one final session in Jan. 2010, although the material relates to Arnold's time spent in various cities of Canada including Montreal, Vancouver, and Winnipeg. All interview sessions are included as parts which include recordings, transcripts and other interview documents. For other associated records see: 'Related Documents' File.

Reilly, Nolan

Project Documents: Abe Arnold Oral History Project

This file contains all documents related to the Abe Arnold Oral History Project. It contains 55 digitized photographs, a daft of Abe Arnold's unpublished memoire chapters, Nolan Reilly's draft manuscript (based not he interview), ,the interview consent form, the Raw unedited audio from the interview sessions, two digitized reel to reel recordings, and an inventory of all the documents archived with the project.

Reilly, Nolan

Abe Arnold Oral History Project

Oral History interview: Nolan Reilly Interviewing Abraham Arnold in 2006–2007. The interview (8h 59mm 52ss) was conducted in Winnipeg primarily between 2006 and 2007 with a final session in January 2010.

The Interview file contains 8 individual interview sessions.
The Related Interview Documents file contains all documentation submitted with the project including digital copies of:
The Interview file contains 8 individual interview sessions.
The Related Interview Documents file contains all documentation submitted with the project including digital copies of:
Unpublished Manuscript (Abe Arnold Memoire); Interviewer Notes; Newspaper Clippings; Unpublished MS (Biography by Nolan Reilly); Photographs;Transcripts for OH Forum; Archival (Unedited) Audio Files

Reilly, Nolan

Nolan Reilly fonds

  • CA OHCUW 22RE
  • Fonds
  • 2006–

fonds consists of Oral History projects completed by Nolan Reilly as the Primary Investigator, or completed by students under his supervision as a Professor of History at the University of Winnipeg.

Reilly, Nolan

Interview with Carlos Sosa

Oral History interview (00h 54mm 40ss) with Carlos Sosa conducted remotely by Emily McPherson in Winnipeg Manitoba, 2021. Interview is indexed and fully transcribed.

Emily McPherson interviews Carlos Sosa about his experience as a participant in disability rights activism and advocacy. The interview begins with Sosa telling detailing his family history and some childhood memories; he then discusses his early experiences in the school system and the pressure he felt to pursue a trade rather than attend university. Speaks about beginning to participate in activism, involvement in the New Democratic Party, and mentorship by the late Jack Layton. He details some of the activist projects that he has been a part of such as the efforts to save the Kelvin Community Centre, affordable university tuition, and efforts to ensure the operation of public services such a libraries and swimming pools. Sosa describes his current work at the CBC and his own experiences with disability and the stigma surrounding it. He discusses his initial perceptions of the MLPD, his involvement in the organization, as well as his choice to create an oral history project based on that organization. The interview concludes with Sosa connecting the human rights movement to oral history and commenting on the impact of the pandemic on the most vulnerable in society.

Oral History Centre at the University of Winnipeg

Results 21 to 30 of 31243