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Haydey, Caroline, 1919-2009

  • CA-OPMA-AR-02
  • Person
  • 1919-2009

Caroline (nee Andrejowich) Haydey was born on September 26, 1919, in Witkowo (a.k.a. Fitkiw) Poland, to parents William (Wasyl) and Pauline (Paulina) Andrejowich. The Andrejowich family settled on a 20-acre farm in the Cook's Creek area in Manitoba. Caroline attended Zora school in Cook’s Creek until grade 8. Her father, Wasyl, worked as a furrier in Winnipeg, while her mother worked as the Vice President of City Gas, Heating, and Appliance Co., Ltd., which she ran together with Caroline’s brother John.

Caroline moved to Winnipeg to complete her education, attending Machray School for grade 9 while working as a nanny. She then began a program at St. John’s Technical High School, but became sick and moved home again. The following year, she returned to Winnipeg and began attending Daniel MacIntyre School. She worked for room and board in Brandon, and was eventually able to attend Normal School. She also taught music to junior classes at Zora School.

She married Peter Haydey of Gonor and had two children, Richard Haydey and Teresa (nee Haydey) Benoit. She worked as a music teacher in Rockwood School for five years. At the same time, she attended night classes and summer school to obtain her B.A. and B.Ed. degrees. She also taught at Grant Park Junior High School and Greenway School.

Upon her retirement in 1980, Caroline Haydey received a Manitoba Teachers’ Society scholarship, which enabled her to relocate to Munich, Germany, for three years in order to obtain her PhD.

Caroline Haydey died on October 26, 2009, in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Rudnicki, Simone, 1926-2018

  • Person
  • 1926-2018

Simone Rudnicki (nee Proulx) was born on September 18, 1926 in St. Boniface, Manitoba. She was born during the Great Depression and raised in St. Boniface as the youngest daughter. Simone was married to Walter Rudnicki for sixty years. She was a Registered Nurse, a Social Worker and mother of five. She passed away in Ottawa on March 2, 2018.

Rudnicki, Walter, 1925-2010

  • Person
  • 1925-2010

Walter Rudnicki was born on September 25, 1925 in Rosser, Manitoba. He received his B.A. from the University of Manitoba (1950) and M.A. in Social Work and Community Organization from the University of British Columbia (1952). Most of his life he worked relentlessly as a public servant and private consultant to improve the lives of Canadian Aboriginal peoples. Walter Rudnicki (Eagle Shield) was a passionate advocate for aboriginal rights in Canada.
During 1944-1946, Rudnicki was stationed overseas with the Royal Winnipeg Rifles and he drew many sketches of military life. Later on in his professional career, as a consultant to aboriginal people, he used his sense of humor and cartoons in his presentations and workshops.
Rudnicki, as a public servant and a private consultant, worked with both the Government and aboriginal people and identified problems with their relationship. He passed away on March 7, 2010 in Ottawa.

Sellors, Roy

  • Roy Sellors
  • Person
  • 1913-2005

Born in Winnipeg in 1913, Roy Sellors benefitted from early exposure to art and design through his father, Ernest W. Sellors. The elder Sellors was a watercolour artist who also produced exquisite and highly decorative porcelain works. He was the director of art for the Winnipeg School Division and spent his career teaching art in high schools.

Roy Sellors began his studies at the University of Manitoba in 1934 as a scholarship student, during a Depression in which few jobs existed even for the brightest students. Sellors's talents were notable: he won a national Royal Architecture Institute of Canada (RAIC) student prize and the RAIC gold medal upon his graduation in 1936. His university years were spent under the direction of John A. Russell, who later became the Dean of the School of Architecture. It was Russell who procured a second scholarship for Sellors – and his close friend, Ray Nolan – to attend the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Here he was further exposed to the dynamic American modernist style that Russell and Dean Milton Osborne (both Americans) were developing at the University of Manitoba. Sellors received his Master of Architecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1939.
Sellors returned to Winnipeg briefly to be what he described as “the first draughtsman” hired by the local firm Moody and Moore. He spent 16 months working there, from May 1936 to September 1937, and returned to the firm in the months before and after his time at MIT. Sellors registered with the Manitoba Association of Architects in 1940 while employed by Moody and Moore.

The Second World War further diminished employment opportunities for young architects, so Sellors travelled in the United States before landing a job with architect Wyatt Hedrich in Fort Worth, Texas. The firm received many contracts for war work such as designing barracks and training facilities, but most of its staff was called up to serve. Sellors had been classified as “4F unsuitable” (for war duty) due to a punctured eardrum, and so was able to work on a great variety of projects until his status as a foreigner working on military projects became an issue for the American government. Undaunted and much enriched by the experience, Sellors moved with his wife Theresa and their first child Paul to Minneapolis. There Sellors joined the firm Long and Thorshow Inc., which proved to be a good career move. It was from there that Dean Milton Osborne and Professor John A. Russell lured him back to the University of Manitoba to start lecturing in the fall of 1946.

The post-war years were an exciting time to be on the faculty at the university. Enrolment was climbing rapidly, facilities were desperately cramped and the Department of Architecture, under its new Dean John A. Russell, was poised for a major reorganization. Familiar as he was with both his alma mater and with modern practice in the United States, Sellors plunged into teaching design, construction, freehand drawing and professional practice. Of particular interest was his work in curriculum development. Sellors was made a Fellow of the RAIC in 1960; the only Manitoban so honoured that year. As a key member of the RAIC Education Committee, he was instrumental in developing the minimum Syllabus Program still in use by the organization. From 1964 on, Roy Sellors was the Curriculum Chair for the University of Manitoba Faculty of Architecture, and during that period the present six-year curriculum was introduced. As well, he was instrumental in having the new Faculty of Architecture building renamed the Russell Building in 1967. Dean Russell died on December 28, 1966, thereby placing Sellors into the position of dean. He served in that capacity until resigning in 1972 to fulfil a long-planned sabbatical trip in Europe with his wife Theresa. He returned to continue as senior professor with the Faculty until his retirement in 1978.

When Sellors and his wife returned to Canada from Minneapolis in 1946, they had two children and three more were soon to follow. They purchased a home in Fort Garry in Wildwood Park, the new garden subdivision developed by Hubert Bird and designed by Cecil Blankstein of Green, Blankstein and Russell. Sellors recalls how the area flooded in 1950 forcing his family to take refuge first with John Russell and later at a cottage. Bird Construction set up a company to repair the houses on a cost basis, helping the fledgling community get back on its feet. Meanwhile both Sellors and Russell picked up lots nearby on South Drive which speculators dumped on the market at deflated prices, following the flood. It was on these new lots that Roy Sellors designed his subsequent family home at 717 South Drive and that of his colleague John Russell at 740 South Drive. The houses are similar, both with floors of precast joists with concrete slabs, exposed wood beam ceilings angled down in the living and dining areas, with natural wood finishing and cork tile throughout the two interiors. Built-in bookcases, floor to ceiling windows, flush mounted fireplaces and attached sun porches make these dwellings fine examples of modernist domestic architecture from the mid-1950s.

Besides a scattering of houses about the province, Roy Sellors’s designs include the Selkirk Memorial on the northern tip of Memorial Boulevard, the Transcona Library, and 14 churches, mainly in Winnipeg. While his favourite church is Our Lady of Victory Memorial Church at Osborne Street and Arnold Avenue, he is best known for St. Bernadette Church at 820 Cottonwood. William P. Thompson describes St. Bernadette as embodying the “structural innovation of experimental materials,” with great laminated buttresses that descend externally at shallow angles, supporting the church on a raised foundation with glazing fully open on each end of the building. The Osborne Street structure, featured in the RAIC Journal, has a cruciform plan with the altar at the centre, lit from above by a raised lantern. By turning the altar to face the congregation (here on three sides) Sellors anticipated the recommendation of Vatican Two by nearly a decade. Sellors further observed that he enjoyed the way his design of St. Vital Catholic Church on Pembina Highway, low and spreading in its mass, seemed particularly compatible with the prairie landscape.

Roy Sellors was a member of the Manitoba Association of Architects (MAA) for more than 50 years, serving two terms on Council and doing extensive committee work. In 1966, he was re-elected vice-chair of the Canadian Housing Design Council, an advisory body to the National Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation. In January 1968, Sellors, then Dean of the Faculty of Architecture, headed a three-man MAA jury for an awards program, the first of its kind in Canada. The 45 entries were assessed on the basis of the fully coordinated architectural solution, including the many planning issues imposed and the resulting design solution. The new building materials and technologies, issues of efficiency and scale, site location and parking were all evolving elements, and this forum provided a good opportunity for peers to examine various resolutions of the real needs of the owner and of the community. Smith Carter won for Place d’Acceuil (the main gate) at Expo ’67, and for the Pan-Am Pool; Libling Michener for the Manitoba Teachers’ Society headquarters on Portage Avenue; and, Etienne Gaboury for Messiah Lutheran Church on Rouge Street.

Roy Sellors passed away in April 2005.

McLeod, Albert

  • Person
  • 1983-2013 ; predominate 1988-1998

Albert McLeod is one of the Two-Spirited Movement’s most active and visible members. He is Metis, descended from Cree and Scottish families, and identifies as a two-spirited gay male. During the 1960s and 1970s, he was raised in Cormorant and The Pas in northern Manitoba, and currently lives in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Since 1986, McLeod has been actively involved in the Two-Spirit Movement, and as a human rights advocate. He has actively advocated for the rights of Aboriginal LGBTQ people, has pushed for their visible and meaningful inclusion in the Canadian Aboriginal Movement and the LGBT Liberation Movement, and has fought against pervasive homophobia and racism. He co-founded a number of organizations devoted to improving the life of two-spirit people by advocating for education, housing, health services, employment training and cultural development. He co-founded the Manitoba Aboriginal AIDS Task Force and was its Project Manager from 1991-2001; he co-founded the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS network in 1997; and is one of the co-founders of the Two-Spirited People of Manitoba Inc., established in 2006. He has helped co-ordinate a number of two-spirit conferences and gatherings as a way to enable two-spirited people to meet with each other in a safe, encouraging environment where traditional cultural practices are integrated with educational workshops. He is also an experienced crafter who creates both traditional regalia and couture dresses. He has worked for the 595 Prevention Team as a Community Development Coordinator, and as a free-lance educator devoted to Aboriginal cultural reclamation, textile art and community development. In 2018 he was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Laws by the University of Winnipeg. He presently serves on the Board of Directors for Two-Spirit People of Manitoba, Inc.In 1990, the term two-spirit was established in Winnipeg, Manitoba at the Third Native American/First Nations Gay and Lesbian Conference by activist Albert McLeod and others. With the belief that naming is a political act, which enables discussion and exploration, the group created the term to reconnect with Aboriginal traditional views related to gender and sexual identity, to emphasize the fluidity of identity creation, to fight against colonialism and Eurocentric categorization of sex and gender identities, and to unite Aboriginal LGBT peoples.
Since the mid-1970s, Aboriginal gay and lesbian organizations have sprung up across North America, and major growth has been seen since 1988. Two-spirit organizations and gatherings were created in order to connect two-spirit individuals and offer a network of support, understanding, and advocacy. These organizations and gatherings seek to address and change the social stigma two-spirit people face due to pervasive racism and homophobia. The latter of which exists in both their local communities and society more broadly. The Basket and the Bow: A Gathering of Lesbian & Gay Native Americans held in Minneapolis in 1988 marked the first gathering of two-spirit people, and was attended by eleven delegates from Winnipeg. Events from the gathering were recorded in Mona Smith’s 1990 video, Honoured by the Moon. Two-spirit gatherings and conventions often contain workshops, as well as sweat lodges, pipe ceremonies, sharing circles, elders, a pow-wow, smudgings and traditional crafts and singing. Often they are held outside of urban centers and are alcohol and drug free events. The high rates of suicide, and HIV-AIDS rates within the two-spirit community are often major discussion topics at the gatherings.

Albert McLeod, one of the Two-Spirited Movement’s most active and visible members, collected the Two-Spirited Collection. Albert McLeod is Metis, descended from Cree and Scottish families, and identifies as a two-spirited, gay male. During the 1960s and 1970s, he was raised in Cormorant and The Pas in northern Manitoba, and currently lives in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Since 1986, McLeod has been actively involved in the Two-Spirit Movement, and as a human rights advocate. He has actively advocated for the rights of Aboriginal LGBTQ people, has pushed for their visible and meaningful inclusion in the Canadian Aboriginal Movement and the LGBT Liberation Movement, and has fought against pervasive homophobia and racism. He co-founded a number of organizations devoted to improving the life of two-spirit people by advocating for education, housing, health services, employment training and cultural development. He co-founded the Manitoba Aboriginal AIDS Task Force and was its Project Manager from 1991-2001; he co-founded the Canadian Aboriginal AIDS network in 1997; and is one of the co-founders of the Two-Spirited People of Manitoba Inc., established in 2006. He has helped co-ordinate a number of two-spirit conferences and gatherings as a way to enable two-spirited people to meet with each other in a safe, encouraging environment where traditional cultural practices are integrated with educational workshops. He is also an experienced crafter who creates both traditional regalia and couture dresses. He is currently working for the 595 Prevention Team as a Community Development Coordinator, and as a free-lance educator devoted to Aboriginal cultural reclamation, textile art and community development.

Two-Spirited People of Manitoba Inc.

  • mb-tsp
  • Corporate body
  • 2018 --

Two-Spirited People of Manitoba Inc. is an organization that seeks to improve the quality of life of Two-Spirit (Indigenous lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) people. It is run by a volunteer Board of Directors, and its activities include awareness workshops, community events, and activism. It has existed since 1986, co-founded by Albert McLeod; it was registered as a Non Profit Organization in 2007. It is one of seventeen organizations affiliated with the International Council of Two-Spirit Societies.

Sybil and Saul Cherniack family

  • Family
  • 1916-1918

Saul Cherniack was a lawyer and politician active in municipal, provincial and federal politics and prominent in many Jewish organizations in Canada. Saul and Sybil (Zeal) Cherniack were married in 1938. The couple had two children: Howard and Lawrence Cherniack.

Saul Cherniack was born in 1917 to Joseph Alter Cherniack and Fanya (Golden) Cherniack in Winnipeg. He graduated with a Law degree from the University of Manitoba. He worked as a lawyer until World War Two when he served in in the army in Artillery and Intelligence. During the war he worked with Japanese Canadians in internment camps.

Cherniack held a number of elected political positions including Winnipeg School Board Trustee (1950-1954), Town of Winnipeg Beach Councillor (1958-1959), Winnipeg City Council Alderman (1959-1960), Metropolitan Corporation of Greater Winnipeg Councillor (60-6), Member of the Legislative Assembly (1962-1981), and Minister of Finance (1969-1972, 1973-1975).

He also served as Board Chair Manitoba Hydro and as a Member Security Intelligence Review Committee. Cherniack held a number of prominent positions with Jewish organizations in Canada, including Vice President of the Canadian Jewish Congress.

Sybil Cherniack was born in 1916 to Joseph and Mary (Litman) Zeal in Blaine Lake, Saskatchewan. She graduated from the University of Manitoba with a Bachelor of Arts.

Sybil Cherniack died in Winnipeg in 1997. Saul Cherniack died in Winnipeg in 2018.

Shaarey Zedek United Synagogue Youth

  • Corporate body
  • [fl. 1957 - 2001]

United Synagogue Youth (USY) is the youth group of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism which was established in 1951. USY operates in both the United States and Canada with 350 chapters across 16 regions. Manitoba is part of a region called EMTZA which is the Midwest region and includes local chapters from Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota and other states. USY teaches Jewish youth important values and skills which are useful, both in their religious and secular communities. Today, EMTZA has chapters in local synagogues throughout the region which provide fun and meaningful programming to young people. USY also boasts weekend conventions which allow teens the opportunity to come together for Shabbat, learn about Judaism and Israel, participate in social action projects, give tzedakah, and spend time with their peers. In the 1970’s, Winnipeg’s Jewish community had many teens involved in local, and international USY programming and events. Locally, programs were run mainly out of the Shaarey Zedek Synagogue.

Parker, Ed

  • Person
  • 1918-1988

Edward Parker was a journalist and public relations officer born in Winnipeg in 1918.

Harold Parker, Edward’s father was the owner of The Israelite Press. Ed Parker attended Machray School, St. John’s High School and Wesley/United College. Parker worked for the Winnipeg Tribune and The Manitoban while attending college. Parker later worked for the Montreal Star, Toronto Star, Ottawa Journal and the Vancouver paper Contact. Parker’s work in public relations including work with the Ottawa Civil Service Recreation Association, Saskatchewan Recreational Movement, Ryerson Technical Institute and Technical Mines Consultants.

Edward Parker married Ilene Vlhov with whom he had four children: Tia, Josh, Ara Rose and Ivor. Parker died in Winnipeg in 1988.

Falk, Wilhelm H., 1892-1975

  • Person
  • 1892-1975

Wilhelm H. Falk, church leader and farmer, was born on October 23, 1892 in the village of Schoenthal, northwest of Altona, Manitoba. He was one of nine children born to Heinrich and Justina (nee Unrau) Falk. One of his siblings and his father died while he was still a young child. His mother then married Abram Bergen who was a widower with five children of his own and this marriage produced another half brother and sister for Falk. He attended private school in Schoenthal where G.G. Neufeld was one of his teachers. In 1912 Falk was baptized on May 27th. A year later her married Sarah Friesen on June 8th. He purchased a farm in Roseville school district and lived there until he retired. He and his first wife had eight children but two died as infants. Sarah then died in 1930. Two years later he married Elizabeth Schellenberg on June 30th. This second marriage also produced eight children, two of which died as infants. Falk was elected to the ministry in the Sommerfeld Mennonite Church and ordained on June 29, 1927 at Schoenthal. He later became one of four ministers who separated from this church in 1936 and became the first Aeltester of the newly formed Rudnerweide Church (later known as the Evangelical Mennonite Mission Conference. He was ordained to this office by Aeltester David Schulz on February 4,1937. During his many years of service to the church, Falk performed 1000 baptisms, 50 funerals, 112 marriages, 14 church dedications, and ordained 48 ministers, 2 bishops and 5 deacons. Wilhelm H. Falk died on July 29, 1975.

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