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authority records

Alexander Presbyterian Church

  • Corporate body

Alexander Presbyterian Church existed in the Manitoba community of Alexander, west of Brandon in the Rural Municipality of Whitehead, from 1887 to 1919. The early Presbyterian worship services were held in the Alexander railway station approximately 1881 with The Rev. William Hodnett as the minister. A Presbyterian Church was built in 1887. Ministers serving the charge included Rev. George Lockhart (1891 - 1895), Rev. C. McDairmid (1895 - 1897), and Rev. John Calder (1898). Rev. George Lockhart returned in 1907 with Mrs. Lockhart as the Sunday School teacher and orchestra conductor. In 1908 a spire with an annex was added to the church building enlarging the floor space for the Sunday School. The Rev. Hyslop Dickson was the minister when Alexander Presbyterian Church formed a Local Union with Alexander Methodist Church in 1919. Alexander Presbyterian Church continued to be used as Alexander Union Church.

Alexander Union Church

  • Corporate body

In 1919, Alexander Methodist Church and Alexander Presbyterian Church formed a Local Union known as Alexander Union Church. The Presbyterian Church continued to be used as the Union Church. The Rev. Hyslop Dickson, who had served Alexander Presbyterian Church since 1918, continued to serve as the first Union Church minister. He was succeeded in 1921 by The Rev. J.S. Caldwell, who remained until 1925. In 1925, the Alexander Union Church officially joined the United Church of Canada to become Alexander United Church.

Alexander United Church

  • Corporate body

Alexander United Church has existed in the Manitoba community of Alexander, located west of Brandon in the Rural Municipality of Whitehead, since 1925. Its predecessor was a Local Union formed between the Alexander Methodist and Presbyterian Churches in 1919. The Presbyterian Church, built in 1887, continued to be used for the United Church. Reverend H.T. Reynolds was the first United minister. A special service on October 23, 1929 was held to celebrate the addition of a full-sized basement to the church. The church spire was removed in 1955 because of deterioration. The Alexander Pastoral charge included Kemnay from 1925 until 1969, and Roseland from 1952 to 1968. Since 1970, Alexander United Church has been served by the minister at Trinity United Church in Brandon. Alexander United Church, as of 2009, is a member of the Assiniboine Presbytery.

Alexander, Walter

  • Person
  • 4 June 1912-22 Dec 1979

Education: MD(Man)1938

Positions: Demonstrator, Otolaryngology, 1947;
Lecturer, Otolaryn, 1948;
Prof & Head, Otolaryn 1955

All Peoples' Mission

  • Corporate body

All Peoples' Mission existed in Winnipeg from 1899 to 1925. The successors of All Peoples' Mission were All Peoples' Stella Avenue United Church and All Peoples' Sutherland Avenue United Church (though collectively these continued to be referred to as 'All Peoples' Mission'). The Mission originated as a Sunday School under the leadership of Dolly McGuire. Classes began in a lean-to constructed up against McDougall Church at the corner of King and Dufferin Avenue. The popularity of the classes inspired the Methodist City Mission Board to officially form a mission for new Canadians immigrants in 1890. The mission, known as the McDougall Mission, rented space on Main Street to accommodate expanding attendance. When the McDougall Methodist Church constructed a new church structure in 1893, the McDougall Mission took over the old McDougall Church and moved it to Austin Street, within close proximity of the CPR station. A sign was eventually attached to the mission which read "A House of Prayer for All People" in eight languages. The Mission took its name from a passage in Isaiah 5, 7: "Mine house shall be called a house of prayer for all peoples". Some of the first ministers supplied by conference to the Mission included Richard L. Morrison, Alfred A. Thompson, Hamilton Wigle, and James S. Woodsworth. In 1901, All Peoples' bought a church structure from the Congregationalists on Maple Street, located between Higgins and MacDonald. The Maple Street Church would serve as the first branch station of All Peoples' Mission in Winnipeg. Rev. R. Morrison became the first Superintendent of the mission and the name 'Maple Street Mission' was adopted. In 1904, a mission for Slavic immigrants was established on Stella and Powers (in the former Bethlehem Church structure which had been purchased in 1895), under the direction of Jaromir V. Kovar and Rev. Hamilton Wigle. The 'Mission for foreigners' was renamed Bethlehem Slavic Mission in 1905, and was eventually renamed simply Bethlehem upon moving from Stella to Burrows Avenue. In 1907,the work of all the mission stations was officially united under the name of All Peoples' Mission and J.S. Woodsworth was appointed Superintendent. The following year, a mission/institute was built on the corner of Euclid and Sutherland. The Euclid Avenue Institute was commonly referred to simply as the 'Institute'. The successful design of the Euclid Avenue building inspired the erection of a similar structure on the corner of Stella Avenue and Powers Avenue in 1909. The 1909 minutes of the Methodist Conference of Manitoba recognize five mission stations of All Peoples': Maple Street, Stella Avenue, Euclid Ave, Burrows Ave and the Exhibition grounds (though the Exhibition station was dropped after 1910, and the Burrows station was removed after 1913). Through its various mission stations, All Peoples' Mission offered kindergarten classes, Christian Education, swimming classes, Night School, Bible Classes, as well as several clubs, including CGIT, Boys Club, North End Women's Club/Council, and a Young Peoples' Society. The structures on both Euclid Avenue and Stella Avenue offered 'swimming baths' to the community. Services at mission stations were held in a variety of languages, including English, Polish, Bohemian and German. In 1913, the Euclid Avenue Institute was renamed after Sutherland Avenue. In 1917, Maple Street Mission became an independent station separate from All Peoples'. Rev. J. Shaver became the superintendent of the mission in 1921 and the name 'City Missions' temporarily replaced 'All Peoples' in describing the urban, Methodist missions of Winnipeg. Maclean Mission temporarily came under the wing of City Missions, before becoming a permanent, independent station. In 1925, Methodist and Presbyterian missions came into union under the United Church of Canada. After church union, the Maple Street Mission united with Point Douglas United Church and All Peoples' Mission included two permanent mission stations at Stella Avenue and Sutherland.

All Peoples' Stella Avenue United Church

  • Corporate body

All Peoples' Stella Avenue United Church existed in Winnipeg from 1925 until 1970. The original site of the Stella Avenue Mission was purchased by the Methodist City Mission Board in 1895. In 1904, a mission for Slavic immigrants was established on Stella and Powers (in the former Bethlehem Church structure which had been purchased in 1895), under the direction of Jaromir V. Kovar and Rev. Hamilton Wigle. The 'Mission for foreigners' was renamed Bethlehem Slavic Mission in 1905, and was eventually renamed simply Bethlehem upon moving from Stella to Burrows Avenue. In 1909, a permanent structure was erected on Stella Avenue to serve as a mission station of All Peoples'. The design of the building was based on the Euclid Avenue Institute, which had been erected the year prior. The structure was well used by the community, especially its programs for women and children. Upon joining the United Church of Canada in 1925, Stella Avenue Mission became the Stella Avenue United Church, though it remained commonly referred to as Stella Mission or All Peoples' Stella Avenue. In 1939, a room in the Stella Avenue building was renovated in order to serve as an auditorium for the congregation. Stella Avenue United Church, along with Sutherland United Church, remained under the guise of All Peoples' Mission for the duration of its existence. Stella and Sutherland were temporarily joined in All Peoples' Mission by both Maclean United Church and St. Giles United Chuch. During the latter years of All Peoples' (the 1960's), the work of the Mission was centred out of St. Giles. By 1970, the congregation of All Peoples' Stella Avenue United Church had disbanded, and the manse at 712 Alfred Avenue was sold, due to declining neighbourhood conditions. Winnipeg Presbytery evaluated and re-directed the work of All Peoples' Mission during 1971-72 and as a result, most of the work of the Stella Mission became incorporated under PACT (People Acting on Concerns Together), as of July 1 1972. PACT functioned until 1978, when it was replaced by the North End Community Ministry (NECM).

All Peoples' Sutherland Avenue United Church

  • Corporate body

All Peoples' Sutherland Avenue United Church existed in Winnipeg from 1925 until 1970. The Euclid Avenue Institute (which later became Sutherland Mission) was built on the corner of Euclid and Sutherland in 1908. The Euclid Avenue Institute was commonly referred to simply as the 'Institute'. In 1913, the Institute was officially renamed after Sutherland Avenue. Early services of the Sutherland Mission were conducted in Polish. A Tuesday Evening Social and Literary Program was one of the earliest community programs offered by the Institute, along with a Boys Club. The Sutherland Avenue Mission/Institute joined the United Church of Canada in 1925, becoming Sutherland Avenue United Church, though it remained commonly referred to as Sutherland Mission, Sutherland Institute, and All Peoples' Sutherland Avenue. Sutherland United Church, along with Stella United Church, remained under the guise of All Peoples' Mission for the duration of its existence. Stella and Sutherland were temporarily joined in the All Peoples' Mission by both Maclean United Church and St. Giles United Church. In 1967, one of the larger rooms within the Sutherland structure, located at 119 Sutherland Avenue, was renovated into a chapel. The congregation of Sutherland Avenue United Church disbanded around 1970. Winnipeg Presbytery evaluated and re-directed the work of All Peoples' Mission during 1971-72 and as a result, the Sutherland Mission was put on a year to year holding status, while most of the work of the Stella Mission became incorporated under PACT (People Acting on Concerns Together). In the summer of 1972, further meetings were held to consider the fate of the Sutherland mission station. The Sutherland Investigative Group was organized, and the mission evolved into a community centre known as the Sutherland Activity Centre. The building was also later used by the Point Douglas Co-operative as a community centre.

Allan, Doris

  • Person

The little that is known about the original owners of the two albums that make up this collection has been discerned from the album contents. Both of the albums document a period of five to ten years in the life of an unmarried young woman. The older album, dating from ca.1905 - 1915, appears to have belonged to a young woman who attended high school in the vicinity of St.Boniface Cathedral. There are no captions and none of the subjects is identified although there are several shots of what appears to be groups of school friends. The other album dates from ca.1934 -1940 and captions indicate that the young woman creator of the album was a 'Corrigan''who is pictured on several occasions with a couple identified as 'father' and 'mother'.

Allan, Hugh

  • Allan_H
  • Person
  • 1917-2004

Hugh Jeffery Gray Allan was born on May 14, 1917 in Cypress River, Manitoba. The Allan family moved frequently when Allan was a child, but he spent most of his adult life in Winnipeg. Allan was a well-respected photographer whose work has been displayed in many publications including: The Winnipeg Tribune, Time magazine, Swedish Press International, Maclean's magazine, and Sports Illustrated. Allan attended Gordon Bell High School and designed the school's crest. In 1947 while Allan was working at the Swift's Plant in St. Boniface, Harold Plant and Art Smales, Swift's news correspondents, knew of Allan's work as an amateur photographer and thought he would be the ideal for taking pictures for the Swift's newspaper. Allan used this as an opportunity to improve his technique and to produce better quality photographs. Over the next few years, Allan began to establish himself as a high quality photographer within the Winnipeg region. Allan was one of the first photographers to perfect the panoramic shot and to use bouncing light to conquer harsh shadows. Allan's big break happened during, the 1950 Manitoba flood disaster where the Winnipeg Tribune hired him to help their photo staff cover the flood. By October 1950, the Winnipeg Tribune hired him as a full time staff photographer. Allan became a well-respected photographer within the Tribune for over twenty years but decided to leave and form his own free lance business in 1970. During Allan's long career, he had the opportunity to cover many exciting events, sports and people such as: the Winnipeg Centennial celebrations, royal visits, the last steam locomotive passenger train, John F. Kennedy in Grand Forks, ND, the 1967 Pan Am games, the Bobby Hull signing at Portage and Main, the Winnipeg Jets, the Blue Bombers, the 1972 Canada-Russia Summit Series, and visits to Winnipeg by Gypsy Rose Lee, Harry Belafonte, Pierre Elliot Trudeau, Gordie Howe and many more.</p>
Allan's love of sports was evident by his participation and his photographic coverage of sports. Allan especially enjoyed golf and curling. Allan was a founding member of the Grey Owl Tournament and was five times skip champion at the newsmen bonspiel tournament. Allan was also one of eight media journalists to begin the Manitoba Sportswriters and Sportscasters Association, (M.S.S.A.) and in 1956, they inaugurated the annual dinner and awards ceremony for Manitoba Athlete of the Year. Allan covered many sport including golf, curling, the Blue Bombers, the Winnipeg Jets, and M.S.S.A atheles of the year.
Allan accumulated awards and honours based on hi swork and contributions to photojournalism which include: the Floyd Davis Memorial Award for substantially contributing to the preservation of the bonspiel (1973), he was inducted to the Media Roll of Honour from the M.S.S.A. (1989), and he was inducted to the Winnipeg Blue Bomber Media Roll of Honour (2002). Hugh Allan passed away on May 30th, 2004.

Allen, Doug

  • Person

Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame & Museum Honoured Member 1994, Builder in Disabled Skiing. Founding member of the Canadian Association for Disabled Skiers, involved with the Canadian Federation of Sport Organizations, volunteer with the 2nd Winter Olympic Games for the Disables in Geilo, Norway, and Chef de Mission at the 3rd Games in Innsburck, Austria, member of the Order of Canada in 1986, and president of the Manitoba Ski Club in teh 1950s.

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