Fonds BF508; Microfilm: R15, pp. 841-1155; R47, pp. 960-1248. - Aberdeen Mennonite Brethren Church Fonds

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Aberdeen Mennonite Brethren Church Fonds

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Fonds

Reference code

CA CMBS BF508; Microfilm: R15, pp. 841-1155; R47, pp. 960-1248.

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Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

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Date(s)

  • 1905-1960 (Creation)

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Physical description

27 cm of textual records
one microfilm reel

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Administrative history

The Aberdeen Mennonite Brethren Church, located in northern Saskatchewan, was a member of the Canadian Conference of the Mennonite Brethren Churches, Rosthern District. The first settlers, consisting of seven families, came to the Aberdeen area in May of 1903. They gave their membership certificates from Russia to Jacob Wiens of Ebenfeld (Laird). At first, the Aberdeen settlers gathered in the home of G.J. Sawatzky, a deacon from Russia, for regular church services. In 1904, when more settlers came from Russia, local services were organized, Sunday School was begun, and a choir was formed under the leadership of A.G. Sawatzky. From 1904-1909, services were held in the Neu Steinbach School. In 1905, Jacob Wiens (Ebenfeld) served six candidates with baptism. Gerhard Siemens from Russia visited Aberdeen in 1906 and under his direction G.J. Sawatzky began the leadership of the church. Minutes and financial records were kept, starting in 1906. The congregation erected a church building in 1909 which was paid for by the following year. Pastors in the church were: G.J. Sawatzky (1906-1909), John P. Siemens (1909-1921), H.G. Sawatzky (1921-1931), Ben L. Sawatzky (1932-1941), Johann Kruger (1942), H.W. Niessen (1943-1944), G.K. Sawatzky (1945-1952), and Archie Kruger (1953-1960). In the 1930s, membership in Aberdeen M.B. Church was over one-hundred, but by 1960, only eighteen members were left. The church closed and the remaining members joined the Saskatoon Mennonite Brethren churches.

Custodial history

Many of the records were microfilmed in 1978 through the work of the Historical Commission of the Mennonite Brethren Conference. The textual records came to the Centre for Mennonite Brethren Studies in 1996 from the Bethany Bible School in Saskatchewan, where they had been housed, probably since the microfilming was done in 1978. In 2002 the Jugendverein records were donated to the archives.

Scope and content

This fonds consists of the following series: Membership and family records including a history of the church (in the German Gothic script), baptisms, births, and deaths; financial records including church land transaction records, records of missions contributions, church offerings, and contributions of the church and individuals; congregational minutes and library records; Jugendverein (young peoples) records. Most of these documents are in bound form and are also available on microfilm except for the young peoples materials.

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Description updated October 17, 2002 by Conrad Stoesz.

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No restrictions on access.

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Series descriptions and file list available.

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Mainly German.

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  • English

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